How is Xanax Abused?

How is Xanax Abused?

 

Xanax is a pill prescribed by doctors typically to manage and mitigate the symptoms of anxiety disorders. Yet Xanax, though universally in pill form, can be abused in a variety of different ways.

 

Xanax has become an extremely dangerous prescription drug epidemic. (Image courtesy of WebMD)

Xanax has become an extremely dangerous prescription drug epidemic. (Image courtesy of WebMD)

How is Xanax Abused?

 

Xanax is classified as a Schedule II drug due to its high potential for abuse and the possibility of leading to severe psychological or physical dependence. Xanax is highly addictive and users often develop a tolerance for the drug. Xanax is meant to only be prescribed by a doctor but addicts utilize various illicit channels to attain the drug. Many addicts frequent different physicians and are dishonest about their medical history in order to obtain multiple prescriptions for Xanax, this is referred to as doctor shopping. There are hundreds of illegitimate websites that sell prescription drugs without requiring a prescription. Other addicts purchase Xanax on the streets from local drug dealers.

 

When used properly and as prescribed, the patient will typically take their prescription in small doses once or twice a day. Even patients who take the drug as prescribed are at risk for psychological and physical dependence. For an addict, this amount can quadruple, and, in time, require more and more simply to achieve the same ‘high’ they had once gotten from a smaller amount. The onset of Xanax is typically 25 minutes, with effects lasting for 4-6 hours. Because of this short half life, abusers can close this window by even half the amount of time in order to stay high. Xanax along with other benzodiazepines are highly addictive, and lack of the drug after long periods of use can lead to withdrawal. Addicts often use alternative routes of administration in order to get high. Some users take the tablet orally, some crush the tablet and snort it and others dilute the tablet in water to inject the drug. While all methods can lead to serious health risks and overdose, users that inject drugs are at a higher risk of accidental overdose and other health complications.

 

Withdrawal from Xanax

 

When a person becomes physically dependent upon a drug, they experience withdrawal symptoms when the effects of that drug wear off. This often drives the addict to continue using, in order to ease their discomfort. Withdrawal symptoms can range in severity depending upon the duration of the abuse and amount of the drug that has been used. Withdrawal from Xanax can be a serious and life-threatening condition. Because of how it affects the brain, the body becomes dependent on the drug to the point where if it not in the abuser’s system they will go into full life-threatening withdrawal. If you or someone you know is addicted to Xanax, it is imperative that they seek help from a medical professional. A person who is addicted to Xanax must go through the detox process under direct medical supervision. While the withdrawal symptoms from all drugs and alcohol are uncomfortable, death can occur during a Xanax detox.  Some of the side effects of withdrawal:

 

• Blurred vision
• Trouble sleeping
• Intense sweating
• Nervous feelings
• Anxiety
• Aggressive behaviors
• Weight loss
• Depression
• Tingling sensation in hands and feet
• Seizures
• Suicidal thoughts
• Death resulting from suicide or other health complications

 

Xanax is a Rising Concern

 

Xanax along with other household prescription drugs have been a rising problem over the last ten years. Some people become dependent upon drugs that have been prescribed by a doctor, while others obtain prescription drugs illegally and become addicted. Prescription drug abuse is just as dangerous as illicit drug abuse. Xanax addiction is serious and can result in accidental overdose and death. If you suspect a family member or someone you love may be abusing Xanax, it is important to confront and support them on the road to get help. While there is no cure for addiction, physical and emotional recovery from addiction is possible. Addiction recovery is a lifelong process, something that can be obtained if the addicted person remains willing to receive help and create the necessary changes in their life.

 

Should you like more information about Xanax detox and long term recovery, please do not hesitate to call us at (888)357-7577. We are here to help!