Differences and Similarities Between Fentanyl and Morphine

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Fentanyl and morphine are both opioid analgesic drugs, meaning that they are used to relieve pain by binding to opioid receptors in the nervous system. Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid substance and morphine is a naturally occurring opioid substance derived from opium poppy plants. Although there are similarities between fentanyl and morphine, each drug has its own distinct applications. This article will address both the differences and similarities between fentanyl and morphine as well as the risks associated with opioid abuse.

 

What is Fentanyl?

 

Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid analgesic drug. It is typically prescribed to patients with an injury, who are experiencing severe pain, or after a patient has undergone surgery. Fentanyl is 50 times more potent than heroin and over 100 times stronger than morphine. Fentanyl is classified as a Schedule II drug due to its high potential for abuse and the possibility of leading to severe psychological or physical dependence. Fentanyl is highly addictive and users often develop a tolerance for the drug. Unfortunately, despite many health benefits it is often abused. Addict’s use and abuse fentanyl recreationally due to the feeling of euphoria and a relaxed state of mind it produces. Fentanyl is often sold illegally on the streets under a variety of different pseudonyms. Some of the street names for fentanyl are: China Girl or China White, TNT, Murder 8, Apache, Cash and Tango.

 

What is Morphine?

 

Morphine is an opioid analgesic drug derived from opium poppy plants, Papaver somniferum. It is typically prescribed to patients who are experiencing moderate to severe pain or for patients seeking pain relief with advanced cancers or terminal cancer pain. Morphine is classified as a Schedule II drug due to its high potential for abuse and the possibility of leading to severe psychological or physical dependence. Morphine is highly addictive and users often develop a tolerance for the drug. Unfortunately, despite many health benefits it is often abused. Addict’s use and abuse morphine recreationally due to the feeling of euphoria and a relaxed state of mind it produces. Morphine is often sold illegally on the streets under a variety of different pseudonyms. Some of the street names for fentanyl are: Dreamer, Emsel, First Line, God’s Drug, M.S., Mister Blue, Miss Emma, Morf, Morpho, and Unkie.

 

Differences Between Fentanyl and Morphine

 

– Morphine is a naturally occurring opioid substance derived from opium poppy plants whereas fentanyl is synthesized and does not occur in nature.
– Fentanyl is 100 times more potent than morphine
– Morphine is used to treat moderate to severe pain whereas fentanyl is used to treat severe pain
– Fentanyl is often prescribed for short-term use after a surgical procedure whereas morphine is not typically used for treating short-term pain after surgery.

 

Similarities Between Fentanyl and Morphine

 

Fentanyl and morphine are opioid analgesic drugs.
– Fentanyl and morphine are prescribed to treat pain.
– Both fentanyl and morphine are prescription drugs that are only meant to be prescribed by a physician.
– Both fentanyl and morphine are available in extended-release (or time release) forms.
– Both fentanyl and morphine are Schedule II drugs due to highly addictive properties and high potential for abuse
– Both drugs are available through illicit channels for addicts who use the drug recreationally

 

What are the Risks Associated With Fentanyl and Morphine and Abuse?

 

When used legitimately and as prescribed, fentanyl and morphine are able to relieve pain and create a sense of euphoria and relaxation. When taken at higher doses, the sense of euphoria and relaxation is intensified, often causing the individual to take the drug more frequently and at higher doses. When fentanyl and morphine are taken for extended periods of time, users often develop tolerance, dependence and are at risk for developing addiction. Individuals who are physically dependent upon fentanyl or morphine, they often experience uncomfortable withdrawal symptoms when they are without the drug. The withdrawal symptoms experienced often drive the individual to continue seeking out the drug. When fentanyl and morphine are combined with other drugs, the risk of accidental overdose significantly increases. Here are some of the negative side effects of fentanyl and morphine use and abuse:

 

– Immune system depression
– Gastrointestinal problems
– Increasing feelings of sedation
– Lack of motivation
– Social withdrawal
– Paranoia
– Personality changes
– Delusions or hallucinations
– Loss of relationships with family and close friends
– Increased risk of accidental overdose and death

 

An individual who is physically and emotionally dependent upon fentanyl or morphine should seek help from a medical professional or addiction specialist.

Related: How Long Does Fentanyl Stay in Your System

 

What Treatment Options Are Available For Someone Suffering From Opioid Addiction?

 

Fentanyl and morphine use and abuse can rapidly manifest into addiction. Addiction is a disease. Emotional and physical recovery is possible. In order to help an individual suffering from addiction, it is imperative that they receive appropriate treatment. Addiction specialists are trained mental health professionals that are able to address both the addiction and the underlying issues associated with the development of the addiction. No one should deal with addiction alone. Addiction specialists can help. An addiction specialist will best be able to determine the right course of action. Outpatient treatment programs and sober living homes provide a safe and drug-free environment where addicts can receive effective treatment, gain the support of a recovery community and experience emotional and physical recovery from addiction. If you would like more information about fentanyl detox and long term recovery, please do not hesitate to call us at (888)357-7577.